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5 Predictions On Life After COVID-19

Read Time: 3 minutes

We’re all thinking it: What will life be like after COVID-19?

 

 

With another extension added to our ECQ, the new normal—whatever it may be—seems to be further and further away. The question “What will life be like after COVID-19?” is one that’s been thrown around even in casual conversations—and we all have our own predictions. 

 

But before we start dreaming of movie houses, parties and other such missed on-ground activities, let’s keep in mind that the normal we had before COVID-19 is a far off reality. Or did you all miss Duterte’s latest updates? (FYI, he made mention of more lenient quarantine guidelines but failed to discuss a timeline).

 

 

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So what are the predictions of life after COVID-19 that we can pretty much expect?

 

Voter turnout to increase

With the presidential elections scheduled for next year and everyone being more critical of their government officials, here’s to hoping that the anger and hope we all feel fuels us to turn up at our respective voting stations next year. 

 

Eyes on you, Gen Z. 

 

Child care will be considered essential work

It’s no secret that our country doesn’t necessarily prioritize quality education (if teachers’ salaries are any indication), but it’s possible that the profession will be considered essential work when things go back to normal. As anyone with a child in the house can attest, it’s difficult to educate one child—let alone 40. 

 

Hats out to educators. Seriously. 

 

Travel troubles

While Philippine passports are far from being the internationally strongest, most of us have still been able to travel to our eyed destinations as long as we pass the visa process. However, it is likely that countries will be more stringent with tourists moving forward. As it is, most international borders are closed to foreign travelers and the level of stringency will take some time before completely lifting. 

 

But looking at things on a more macro level, this means that imports and exports will experience a slow down as well. Governments will rightfully dial down on protocols and replace them with more hard working practices. All around the world, governments cannot (and should not) give each other the benefit of the doubt. 

 

 

A dip in the economy

With companies closing their doors during the epidemic and others functioning on a limited basis, it is clear that our country should brace itself for an economic dip. This could mean anything from job loss to an increase in prices and possibly even salary cuts across the board. There is very little we can do to prepare give the current situation we’re already in, but let’s do what we can to soften the blow.

 

What else can we expect? No one’s going to bail us out of this one. 

 

Digital everything

Companies and groups have had to fast-track their digital efforts in light of COVID-19. Seminars are being held online, concerts are being recorded in bedrooms, meetings are done through screen sharing. And while, on a professional level, it is likely that in-office work will go back to normal at the soonest possible time, we should expect the digital landscape to stay on the trajectory it’s currently on—especially since individuals are likely to hold on to their reservations when it comes to large mass gatherings. 

 

RELATED: How To Prepare For The Looming Economic Disruption

 

I know that we’re all itching for the lockdown protocols to lift—for reasons of selfish natures or otherwise. We want our plans to be put back into place, and we miss the freedom we used to have. But we can’t forget that rushing too fast into normal (or even the new normal) could backfire; we could be back to ground zero before we know it. 

 

 

So keep washing your hands, keep your distance and do not forget all the lovely lessons this enhanced community quarantine has taught you.

 

 

Art Matthew Ian Fetalver

About The Author

Made of sarcasm and expletives. Did three years for an economics degree, rewarded myself with three years in the insurance biz. Entered this world as a freelance writer for entertainment and news, now making a living on movies, intimate interviews and the hush-hush of relationships.

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