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The Art Of Whiskey According To Jameson

The Art Of Whiskey According To Jameson

How do you know which whiskey works best for you?

 

 

We don’t know how old whiskey is exactly, but we do know that one John Jameson established Jameson Irish Whiskey way back in 1780. Since then, it’s grown to be the top selling Irish whiskey in the world—and that’s saying something. So when we were given the opportunity to do whiskey tasting with brand ambassador Fintan Cannon, we couldn’t exactly say no (but it’s not like we wanted to either).

 

 

RELATED: Whiskey Cocktail Do-It-At-Home Recipes

 

So what do you look for when you’re drinking a glass of clean whiskey?

 

The color

When it comes to whiskey, the color is arguably the first thing you notice. And while it can range from a light gold to a deep brown, this only signifies how long the alcohol has been aged—the darker the color, the longer it’s usually been aged.

 

The smell

Before you stick your nose in the glass, swirl it around a little. And while you’re at it, don’t actually stick your nose in. As you move the liquid around, let the smell reach out to you instead of the other way around. What you’ll sniff depends on the blend of the whiskey, but it’s natural to get whiffs that are a little woody and sweet.

 

The taste

Let’s be honest, people, this is the most important part. And while this depends on the whiskey you’re actually drinking, it can get really potent. Suggest to start things off with the Jameson Original and work your way to their more aged varieties.

 

 

RELATED: Why Do People Think Women Only Drink When They’re Alone/Sad/Looking To Get Some?

 

And while we can give you all this information, the best way to learn is to actually try things out—and St. Patrick’s Day might be the best time to do so! What started as a religious holiday to celebrate the country’s patron saint has evolved into a celebration of all things Irish. So visit The Meeting Point in Poblacion this Saturday and get your taste of Jameson—we’ll see you there.

 

RELATED: Why Do People Think Women Only Drink When They’re Alone/Sad/Looking To Get Some?

 

 

Art Alexandra Lara

About The Author

Her Economics background is super helpful in her day-to-day life. She likes writing about film, television, hugot stories, drinks and people.

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