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Ramdon and Then Some: Instant Noodle Recipes for Your Consideration

Read Time: 4 minutes

Starring your all-time favorites: Shin ramyeon, pancit canton, Nissin cup noodles and Indomie

 

 

There are moments when I catch myself thinking about the companions I’ve kept close from childhood to adulthood, and not a single soul has stuck by me quite like instant noodles have. Lucky Me’s pancit canton—first exclusively in its zesty calamansi flavor and then combined with a packet of chilimansi in more recent years—carried me through after-school meriendas and high school all-nighters. When I finally got my parents’ go signal to start traveling with friends, red-eye flights became synonymous with piping hot Nissin cup noodles, cradled ever-so-gently in my palms in case of air turbulence. Flash forward to the present: nothing spells comfort quite like instant ramyeon—specifically Shin, with a sheet of sliced cheese, cubes of cheddar, a poached egg and an extra drizzle of chili sauce. Ugh.

 

There’s something so comforting about digging into a bowl, plate or cup of starchy instant noodles. We’re bound—whether by sentiment, familiarity or simply our Asianness—to our 3-minute noodle of choice. We’re also particularly attached to the way we prepare them: from little tweaks in the sauces we mix in to the toppings we choose to pile on.

 

If you found that you enjoyed our last quarantine-friendly recipe round-ups (here and here, if you haven’t read ‘em just yet!), we bring you yet another assortment of dishes to try out—only this time, we’re putting our favorite instant noodles front and center.

 

RELATED: They Say Cooking Is Therapeutic, Here’s What I Learned To Make In The Past Month

 

The Classic Ramdon

 

Ah, who could forget the dish that Parasite propelled to iconic (not to mention socially conscious) status? Ramdon makes use of two kinds of instant noodles from South Korea: Neoguri, which is essentially seafood udon, and Chapagetti or Jjapaghetti, which are noodles in dark soybean paste. Boil both kinds of noodles in a pot. Separately, season and slice steak before cooking in a pan. Once the noodles and the beef finish cooking, take off heat. Mix the entire packet of flavoring from the Chapagetti and half the flavoring from the Neoguri into the noodles. Once mixed, top off the dish with the cooked steak. Serve.

 

Shin Ramyeon Hotpot

Recipe from Jessica A.

 

 

Stir fry pork (preferably the kind used for shabu-shabu!) in sesame oil. Add in 500mL of water and throw in the seasoning powder from the a fresh Shin ramyeon packet. Once the water comes to a boil, add in sliced cabbage, bean sprouts and mushrooms into the broth. Add in the noodles and cover the pot until cooked. Top off with egg, cheese and green onion if preferred. Serve.

 

Sesame-Ketchup Ramyeon with Sausage

Recipe from Ash I.

 

 

Cook up a packet of Shin ramyeon and mix in a small dollop of ketchup to add thickness and sweetness. Add in chopped sausage, sesame seeds and nori flakes. Serve.

 

Pancit Canton with a Twist

While pancit canton is pretty exciting on its own, here’s an intriguing idea I’ve come across a number of times on my scour for recipes online. Like chopped peanuts lend an extra crunch to pad thai, top off your noodles with crushed potato chips for some additional texture.

 

K-Cup Noodles

 

When we think of Korean noodle dishes, our minds tend to flutter straight to instant ramyeon (guilty) or popular K-cuisine like japchae. YouTube chef Seonkyoung Longest shows us that these don’t have to be the only options. In fact, something as simple as your good ol’ cup noodles can be amped up with a few extra ingredients. In the clip above, she demonstrates how to make two quick meal fixes: bulgogi cup noodles, and spicy pork kimchi cup noodles.

 

Indomie Burger

 

Indomie purists, forgive me for I have sinned, but humor me for a second. Indomie’s instant mie goreng noodles make for a perfect afternoon or post-night out snack (or as NIKI says, for when you’re “45% hungry”) we’re keeping our palates open to more filling, more outrageous forms means of enjoying the Indonesian specialty. Above, Buzzfeed’s Inga teaches NIKI a couple of unexpected ways to cook up Indomie. The one that we’re dog-earing? Easily the Indomie burger.

 

 

RELATED: Is NIKI’s Switchblade the Quarantine Anthem We Needed?

 

Have any cooking tips up your sleeve? Chime in in the comments section and let us know what instant noodle dish you’ve been cooking up during the quarantine.

 

 

Art Matthew Ian Fetalver

About The Author

Part-time rowdy ruff girl, full-time fangirl wonder

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