Blast From The Past: How Our Y2K Interests Are Getting Us By

by

September 20, 2021
Read Time: 3 minutes

We’re not the only ones turning back into teenagers in quarantine

 

 

For the past few months the world has spent locked in, the return of trends from the Y2K era is seen to be a big effect of the pandemic. The birth and popularity of the kidcore aesthetic gave rise to everyone wearing and making their own beaded jewelry, knitting their own colorful cardigans and crop tops and even adding ugly, chunky shoes into their closets. But more than fashion trends coming back full circle, young adults and professionals seemed to regress or revisit their hobbies from when they were, albeit younger. 

 

Trading game cards are rising in value, communities about building computers from scratch are growing and many are unearthing and modifying their old gaming consoles. This generation’s young adults turn to these as a form of self-care or find something enjoyable within the four corners of their homes. Along the way, they discovered that adulthood doesn’t mean you’ve gotten rid of your inner child—you can still be playful in your own way. Yes, even at home.

 

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There’s little to no room for judgment

Abby is a 21-year old fresh graduate who found herself circling back to her old teenage hobby of watching anime and reading manga. Her humble beginnings were shoujo titles or those skewed for young women, but recently, it’s all about shounen titles that are meant for teenage boys that occupy her watchlists and reading lists. When asked about the reason why she went back to her old hobbies, Abby shares, “Being alone for so long and trapped in my own house made me return to my roots. I’m now able to enjoy things without being ashamed of being told I’m cringey.”

 

Marielle, a 22-year old multimedia specialist and writer, echoes this sentiment after finding her way back to her previous hobbies, such as gaming. “I guess because people stopped being mean about every ‘embarrassing’ and ‘cringey’ interest you had. Since we’re all left to our devices, there’s no need to put this ‘cool’ front,” she explains. Marielle has been a gamer since she was young, which became the foundation of her interest in the latest multiplayer online battle games.

 

There’s no such thing as perfect timing

Alyssa, a 22-year-old graphic designer, unearthed her love for journaling and collecting cute stationery. Before the pandemic, she used to journal for only the exciting things about her life, however, Alyssa shares that “I realized that life doesn’t have to be uninteresting [whenever I journal]. Sometimes you can just talk about things you’re grateful about or make pretty things.” This appreciation led her to create a gratitude journal and sell stationery she made herself. Even the mundane or the little things we can do can be worthwhile to journal about.

 

With more time spent at home, coupled with the added stress of the pandemic, we’re trying to look for ways to ease the load off our shoulders. So, we turn to these kinds of activities for comfort and short bouts of escapism. A slight reprieve we look forward to at the end of the day, that tiny spark of color that will break the gray of monotony in our routines.

 

RELATED: #IsolationCreation: The Importance of Creativity Amid Difficult Times

 

There’s no expectation of being a pro in your hobby or judgment to be too old for something—what’s important is that you enjoy what you’re doing. One can never be too old to have fun or wait for the perfect timing to enjoy their interests. So we’re all encouraged to embrace the purest joy about having fun because bringing color into your life has no age limit.

 

This story is powered by Royal. They’ve constantly encouraged people to stay in touch with your playful spirit. Be part of their #GenerationKulit and meet fellow colorful people by going to their Facebook page!

 

 

Art Matthew Ian Fetalver

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