Lessons We Learned From She Talks Asia’s Reframe

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April 21, 2021
Read Time: 2 minutes

On self-worth, movement and communication

 

 

Having started as a safe space to have honest conversations among friends, She Talks Asia is a product of five driven female founders: writer-editor Sarah Meier, creative director and life coach Victoria Herrera, educator and Mano Amiga Pilipinas founder Lynn Pinugu, award-winning actress and wellness advocate Iza Calzado-Wintle and TV host and author Bianca Gonzalez-Intal.

 

For this year’s annual She Talks Asia Conference, it went virtual, with the theme of reframing your mind and body. Having all this time in quarantine has given us one opportunity after another to explore and learn—even unlearn—our thought processes. Ahead, our biggest lessons on self-worth, movement and communication.

 

RELATED: She Talks Asia Women’s Summit 2019: Healing Conversations On A Woman’s Worth

 

 

Reconnect Your Body (Sarah Meier & K. Go)

There are many ways we disconnect from our body during grave moments that cause deep-seated trauma and shame. For cousins Sarah Meier and K. Go, the daily movement practice of body—through dance, meditation and exercise—can help overcome these circumstances. Discovering that you are the expert of your own body and that you have autonomy over it gives you space to practice agency. Honor your body and listen to it!

 

Retrain Your Mind (Carelle Herrera and Sara Black)

The brain has a pattern recognition, a clear communication between this part of your body and the rest. How you label your experiences gives you the ability to train your brain as to how these can serve you. Holding on to beliefs, especially those that are damaging, can take its toll on you in the long run; you may carry this with you. Be the master of your thoughts, and allow your belief system to pivot towards self-compassion.

 

Own Your Voice (Ayn Bernos with Bianca Gonzalez)

“We shouldn’t assume that somebody will say what we want to say, ” shares Morena the Label founder, Ayn Bernos. Having difficult conversations with others begins with asserting yourself during moments that matter. At the same time, a conversation needs to be other-centered, with (constructive) voices that can permeate beyond our own circle of confirmation bias. This allows other people to be part of the conversation. Finding your voice is as important as guarding it!

 

Embrace Your Value (Reese Fernandez-Ruiz & Marie Raymundo)

As women, there are plenty of factors—cultural, religious, systemic and practical—that hamper us from advancing in our careers and other equally significant parts of our lives. To embrace our inherent values, we need to learn how to refine and pursue our asks (e.g. a salary raise). This breaks deeply ingrained barriers that take us a step back from what we want.

 

 

Missed She Talks Asia: Reframe? See the highlights here.

 

 

Art Matthew Fetalver

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