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Can We Change These Toxic Pinoy Habits? | Wonder

Can We Change These Toxic Pinoy Habits?

Are you guilty of patronizing these habits?

 

 

History books would tell you that Filipinos are known for being the most hospitable, warm and friendly people there are. Add this to the fact that we have some of the world’s most beautiful sites and sceneries, and we should be as thriving as our neighboring countries. Following this thinking, why does it feel like we’re falling behind?

 

Well, not to discount the values we talk so much about, but as Pinoys we have some pretty bad habits that not only affect how we make decisions personally, but also how we deal with certain issues as a country. So take a seat because here’s the tea, sis:

 

RELATED: Pinoy Culture: Why Do We Smart Shame?

 

We have a general disregard for rules

Everyone thinks that it’s okay not to follow rules when no one’s there to punish them for it, or worse, if everyone else was doing it anyway. Take for example, one of the simplest rules there is: to stand behind the designated (and prominently marked!) areas when queuing for the train. Granted, this is not much of a rule as it is proper train etiquette and yet, we’re having such a hard time following it.

 

We still function on ‘Filipino Time’

If you arrange to meet at 10, everyone arrives at 11. Sure, we joke about it every now and then, but it doesn’t make it any less rude to not show up on time. Unless you’re Queen Clarisse of Genovia, I’m afraid you don’t have any excuses for being late.

 

Queen GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY

 

We’re apathetic, when the issue doesn’t affect us

Talk about the rights of contractual employees or the Lumads and no one bats an eyelash; but when news of Uber closing comes out, everyone suddenly has something to say. It’s fine to talk about it, sure, but speaking out solely on issues that directly affect you is a bit selfish, don’t you think?

 

We fat-shame our own family and friends

Let’s not forget that old family reunion spiel, “Uy, taba-taba mo na!” It’s still confusing why our own family, for crying out loud, uses our weight as a conversation starter as if there’s nothing else to talk about, as if your weight defines who you are as a person. Be thicc and be proud, girl. How you look is nobody else’s business but your own. Sorry, tita.

 

We’re proud to be Pinoy, sometimes

Picture this: someone wins an international competition. The next day, we learn that the supposed winner’s great grand uncle’s second cousin is Filipino—and suddenly everyone’s proud to be Pinoy. All while this same group of people look down on local artists and films thinking they’re too jeje or jologs for their taste.

 

 

Toxic, that’s what these habits are. But luckily for us, we’re also known for being resilient, for being strong and continuously believing that everything can be better. But for this change to happen, we must be willing to subject ourselves to change as well. Let’s not let these habits bring down who we are as individuals and as a nation. Be the change that this country needs.

 

RELATED: Pinoy Pride? These Foreigners Teach Us What It’s All About

 

 

Words Ella Carlos

Art Alexandra Lara

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