Connect With Us

Jason Dhakal’s Cover Shoot Style: Breaking down Looks with Stylist Jana Silao

The Visual Club’s resident stylist talks inspiration, visualization and dressing up our July cover star

 

 

As July shines a light on “Kids These Days”––the makeup artist who pushed the boundaries of boy beauty for this same cover and the talented young musician who appeared on it, of course––it’s only apt to put the spotlight on the bright, young creative who brought the cover style concept to life.

 

Meet 24-year-old stylist Jana Silao, whose work you may have seen in her collaborations with brands Don’t Blame the Kids and SM Youth, artists like Sofia Romualdez of Careless Music and personalities like Richard Juan. She’s taken her distinct pumped-up, life’s-a-party aesthetic and injected it into the WonderxJason cover shoot, bringing together an unabashedly expressive take on streetwear.

 

 

Wonder: You have a very clear grasp of your identity when it comes to styling…and it shows! Can you tell us about how you learned to zero in on your aesthetic?

Jana Silao: I have always been drawn to pop art and fun visuals. So I did my research and discovered Andy Warhol. With that as a starting point, I learned about kitsch and lowbrow art. Since I was a kid, I also loved Harajuku and K-pop fashion, so I guess my overall aesthetic is heavily influenced by all these references.

 

W: Moving on to WonderxJason, can you walk us through your process for tackling the cover shoot moodboard (for that matter, any moodboard for a shoot)?

JS: I love [your] initial moodboard for this shoot; it was detailed and specific, so it was easy for me to understand and interpret the whole direction. In other cases, we ask the client how they visualize the outcome. From there, my team and I would make our own decks, collaborate on the art direction and suggest it to the client.

 

A peek at the #WonderxJason moodboard.

 

W: When you prepare for your shoots, where do you usually turn to for inspiration and styling ideas?

JS: It depends on the pegs! Sometimes Pinterest, YouTube or Vimeo [are my] best options for inspo, but for me, Instagram is a nice and easy platform for inspiration. It’s always up-to-date and where I see new lookbook releases from brands or new posts from the fashion people I follow.

 

W: Can you drop the handles of your top three sources for fashion inspo on Instagram?

JS: This is hard [laughs], but if we’re focusing on my inspiration for this shoot with Jason, it would definitely have to be @dec.ao, @jigeumyeogi and @realllllmino.

 

T-shirt and satin jacket, PLASTIC HONEYMOON, purple trousers, HAUTE STUFF ORIGINAL, bucket hat, MARV DAWSON, bag, EPISODES, shoes, EYTYS

 

W: What do you do to make sure you inject your own flavor into the styling pegs you use?

JS: It’s important to achieve the key elements in the approved moodboard, but I always come prepared with suggestions on editing the final look…like adding a quirky accessory or layering another piece. I encourage the clients to be open to just try and be experimental with it.

 

W: Now, let’s talk about the cover shoot looks. What are three things to consider in order to pull off the powder blue look?

JS: Overall? Silhouette, fit and textures.

 

Powder blue blazer and shorts, YVES CAMINGUE, leather vest, HAUTE STUFF ORIGINAL, bucket hats, HARDHEADED, Off White sneakers, CONVERSE, bag, EPISODES

 

W: Got any style tips for anyone intimidated by animal print?

JS: JUST GO FOR IT [laughs]. If we’re going more concrete and intensive about styling, the safest way to wear it could be pairing it with solid colors. Try black or denim for starters. Wearing animal print in oversized pieces can make the overall look more streetwear and modern, too. Don’t be afraid to mix and match! Animal print is not that scary to wear [laughs].

 

Jason Dhakal Leopard Print - WonderYellow cropped vest, A-COLD WALL, yellow t-shirt, TENEMENTS, animal-print satin jacket, PLASTIC HONEYMOON, orange joggers, YVES CAMINGUE, sneakers, RAF SIMONS, bag, HUMAN MADE

 

W: How would you vouch for the “more is more is more” approach to fashion?

JS: “More is more is more” is a rare break from the usual casual outfit. I think we are all creatives at heart and we need a release sometimes, which is something [that can be] expressed through the clothes we wear. Maximalism does not necessarily mean super accessorized or super colorful outfits. It could mean layers, solid monochromes, oversized fits or just an outfit beyond your comfort zone that still makes you feel your best. I have a motto in mind that I’d like to share: “Wear something that makes you look like a walking Pinterest peg.” [Laughs] 

 

RELATED: Wonder Plays Dress-Up: Masculine/ Feminine

 

 

Featured Photos Kris Villano

Art and Art Direction Alexandra Lara

Fashion Direction Nicole Blanco Ramos

Styling Jana Silao assisted by Val Silao

Beauty Direction Cessi Treñas

Hair and Makeup Jia Achacruz

Location Creativx Studio

About The Author

Sometimes a stylist, sometimes a writer, powered by coffee.

Comments

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

You don't have permission to register