Connect With Us

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil Review

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil Leaves A Sweet Aftertaste

Read Time: 3 minutes

Angelina Jolie reprises her role as Maleficent: Mistress of Evil

 

 

Most of us grew up at a time when Maleficent was painted as the villain of all villains. Her—with her black cape, sharp horns, evil minions and dark magic—scared the socks out of many. She wanted Aurora to fall into a deep sleep because she wasn’t invited to a party. Even then, the act seemed a little petty and completely uncalled for. 

 

But then Disney decided to re-tell the story of Maleficent; they wanted to prove that she wasn’t the evil we remember from our childhoods. The first chapter was released in 2014 and the second helping, Maleficent: Mistress Of Evil, is now in cinemas.

 

 

RELATED: Our Favorite TV and Movie Freaks to Channel This Halloween

 

The film opens with a little narration: Even after Aurora (Elle Fanning) becomes Queen Of The Moors and the good side of Maleficent (Angelina Jolie) is made public, the past is still not erased; everyone believes that the evil in Maleficent is stronger than ever. She’s still the villain, even as Aurora and Prince Philip (Harris Dickinson) get engaged. 

 

But despite the negative press, Philip’s parents, Queen John (Robert Lindsay) and Queen Ingris (Michelle Pfeiffer) agree to have Maleficent and Aurora over for dinner. And as the Queen goes on about how Aurora and Philip will live in their castle and how Aurora will finally have a real mother, Maleficent loses her cool—just as the King falls under a dark spell. 

 

The turn of events has even Aurora convinced that Maleficent: Mistress of Evil is back, and she chooses to stay put even as her godmother orders her back to the Moors. As she makes her way back home, Maleficent is struck down by an iron bullet as she flies through the evening sky and falls into the sea—but then she’s saved by a winged silhouette, is taken to a secret island filled with creatures like her. Too bad these individuals want to wage a war against the humans.

 

 

RELATED: Joker Is All At Once Disturbing, Fascinating & Unsettling

 

The plot of the film itself isn’t the most imaginative; you might be able to tell how it ends from the trailer—it’s a Disney movie, after all. But just because you’re aware of the ending doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the ride getting there. 

 

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil is paced quite well, thanks to its mix of action, magic, drama and heartfelt speeches. It doesn’t linger too long on a scene, but you hardly want for more as well. Each piece of the puzzle is gently and intelligently placed to create the bigger picture. And before you know it, the ending scene you knew was coming is over and done with. 

 

From start to finish, the movie is an enjoyable one and—at select scenes—draws gasps from even its older audience. By far, it’s not an eccentric film nor is it about to win any awards, but it does hit the spot for a family movie that everyone will actually enjoy.

 

 

RELATED: American Horror Story 1984: Mr. Jingles Recap

 

Another wonderful thing about the film is that it gives us the opportunity to watch Jolie shine on screen again. She’s a perfect mix of funny, sarcastic, vulnerable, brave and kick-ass—and her performance is complemented by Fanning’s take on Aurora. The two command the screen together in different ways: Jolie with her staggering stature, Fanning with her doll-like features and innocent charm. 

 

We learned who they were in their first tie-up in 2014, but Maleficent: Mistress of Evil puts their relationship to the test.

 

 

 

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil is now showing in cinemas nationwide.

 

Make your viewing experience of Maleficent: Mistress of Evil an even better one by heading to Ayala Malls Manila Bay.

 

 

Art Alexandra Lara

About The Author

Made of sarcasm and expletives. Did three years for an economics degree, rewarded myself with three years in the insurance biz. Entered this world as a freelance writer for entertainment and news, now making a living on movies, intimate interviews and the hush-hush of relationships.

Post a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

You don't have permission to register