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Best Graphic Novels of All Time List

A Definitive List of the Best Graphic Novels of All Time

Okay, ~relative~, but here’s ~our~ list of the best graphic novels of all time

 

 

One of the best things about literature, I’ve found, is that it has so many formats to get lost in; there is virtually something for everyone. Short stories? Poetry? Novels? Comics? Graphic Novels? Manga? Take your pick, have a seat and figuratively get lost.

 

RELATED: Filipino Comic Books You Need To Start Reading

 

But today is about the graphic novel—of which the definition has been debated on endlessly. So for the sake of clarity and uniformity, let’s go with:

 

best-graphic-novels-of-all-time-definition

 

Now “best graphic novels of all time” is a high claim to make and this list is likely not to please everyone. Some favorites won’t make it; some might not even be familiar to the most well-read. But oh well, because “best” is relative.

 

Akira

Katsuhiro Otomo

 

The story: Thirty-one years after the Japanese government drops an atomic bomb on Tokyo, a bike gang leader by the name of Kaneda tries to save his friend, Tetsuo, from another secret project. When Tetsuo’s supernatural powers start to manifest, a final battle must be fought.

 

Why we love it: For its complex and multi-layered plot, for its portrayal of society and politics.

best-graphic-novels-of-all-time-akira

 

Asterios Polyp

David Mazzucchelli

 

The story: An award-winning architect, who’s never actually built a building, is in the middle of a spiritual crisis. When his own life starts to fall apart, he runs away to try and (figuratively) rebuild.

 

Why we love it: There are very few stories out there like Asterios Polyp and there’s a lot to learn about perspective and self-awareness.

 

Blacksad

Juan Díaz Canales and Juanjo Guarnido

 

The story: Portrayed in noir style, the characters here are anthropomorphic animals whose species reflect their personality. Think canines are policemen and underworld characters are reptiles.

 

Why we love it: Noir. Watercolor art. Animals. Heavy subject matters presented with fluffy animals.

best-graphic-novels-of-all-time-blacksad

 

Blankets

Craig Thompson

 

The story: An autobiographical graphic novel, the story follows the adolescence and young adulthood of Craig. With a mix of present-time and flashbacks, we see him grow in a strictly Christian family as he maneuvers around first love, abuse, spirituality and relationships.

 

Why we love it: Because it tackles religion without being too preachy. And in a country like ours (with families like ours), there are personal experiences to be shared.

 

Daytripper

Fábio Moon and Gabriel Bá

 

The story: Brás de Oliva Domingos is the child of a famous Brazilian writer. While he dreams of becoming an author himself, he spends his days writing people’s obituaries. And in writing about others’ ends, he asks: When will his life really begin?

 

Why we love it: The hauntingly beautiful stories—both from the pen and experiences of Brás. And the lesson that life offers spaces filled with love.

best-graphic-novels-of-all-time-daytripper

 

Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid On Earth

Chris Ware

 

The story: A meek man in his mid-30’s, Jimmy Corrigan agrees to meet his father for the first time behind his mother’s back. Socially awkward and barely able to communicate with anyone other than his overhearing mother, the two men barely do anything.

 

Why we love it: Unlike most graphic novels, this one is quieter and all about introspection.

 

Persepolis

Marjane Satrapi

 

The story: Set during and after the Islamic Revolution, this graphic autobiography is a heartbreaking yet humorous story that follows the formative years of a young girl growing up in revolutionary Iran. As if childhood and adolescence weren’t enough of an issue, she grows amidst suffering and chaos.

 

Why we love it: It reminds us of empathy for the moments we can’t see beyond our worlds.

best-graphic-novels-of-all-time-persepolis

 

Sandman

Neil Gaiman

 

The story: Destiny, Death, Dream, Desire, Despair, Delirium (once Delight) and Destruction: seven brothers and sisters who have been responsible since the beginning of time. Each one is responsible for the realms that their names describe. Years ago, a coven attempted to take Death captive (in order to end death), but got their hands on Dream instead—who, once he escapes, must face the changes of his disappearance.

 

Why we love it: A good entry point to graphic novels, Neil Gaiman’s Sandman is a modern classic that incorporates different mythologies with tragic sentiment.

 

Saga

Brian K. Vaughan

 

The story: Alana and Marko are husband and wife, each one representing opposing races engaged in a long war. Together, the two need struggle to care for their daughter (who is also sometimes our unseen narrator).

 

Why we love it: It portrays endless races and the endless possibilities of hatred and discrimination—and the benefits of opposing them. Plus: it’s a Romeo-Juliet story set in a space opera.

best-graphic-novels-of-all-time-saga

 

Uzumaki

Junji Ito

 

The story: In the fictional Japanese town of Kurôzu-cho, supernatural events surrounding spirals start spreading. While the locals become obsessed and paranoid about the shapes appearing left and right, several gruesome deaths start occurring.

 

Why we love it: It’s visually stunning, in a strange can’t-help-but-look-at-it way.

 

 

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Did your greatest of all time make it to our list of the best graphic novels of all time? We apologize if it didn’t, but we’re willing to talk—let’s just be healthy about it, ey?

 

 

Art Alexandra Lara

About The Author

Her Economics background is super helpful in her day-to-day life. She likes writing about film, television, hugot stories, drinks and people.

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